DIY: Pacifier holder repair using snaps

This “tutorial” is so easy and self-explanatory, that I suppose it doesn’t deserve a tutorial. But I’ve decided to compile posts anyway that use snaps in DIY projects, because snaps are AWESOME! You can do so many things with them! Check out this list that KAM Snaps put together on their Web site.

When my son is tired, he loves his paci; and I love that he loves his paci. Trust me. I spent the first two painful months of his life as his pacifier, so I LOVE his paci. Keeping the paci on his little person is not always an easy thing. We have at least three pacifier holders (because they keep disappearing), but it’s disappointing how quickly the hook and loop fastener wears down and stops working. It would be a very bad day for Baby J and for myself, if we’re outside the home and the paci fell off because of the worn fasteners and was subsequently lost! So I decided to fix the holders…and even make them better (in my opinion).

BEFORE (Don't be fooled...that Velcro will NOT stay fastened.)
BEFORE (Don’t be fooled…that Velcro will NOT stay fastened.)

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If you don’t have snaps and pliers, but want to repair the velcro on your pacifier holders, buy something like this:

Comes in white too
Comes in white too…maybe even other colors…don’t know

Velcro (or another hook & loop fastener brand) is not as cool as snaps, but it’ll work. You’ll have to use a seam ripper to remove the old Velcro and then sew the new strips on. A sewing machine will work fastest, but you can obviously sew by hand if you don’t have a machine.

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On to the snaps!

I purchased Dritz Babyville Boutique Snap Pliers and snaps during an online sale a few months ago, and I love them! They’re working great for me. I recently discovered the same Babyville pliers along with packs of white snaps for sale at Hobby Lobby. You can also check local fabric stores. Otherwise, they’re easily available on the Web.

To complete this project, you’ll need a set of snaps, an awl, and pliers or a press.

Click on photos to enlarge:
Snaps, pliers, and an awl
Snaps, pliers, and an awl

It’s best to remove the old hook and loop first, although you could work around it if needed. A seam ripper is the best thing to use when errrrr ripping seams. Unfortunately, I have to use my seam ripper much more often than I would like.

My old friend/nemesis...the seam ripper
My old friend/nemesis…the seam ripper

Tear out that velcro (without destroying the pacifier holder)!!!

Use seamripper to tear out thread securing old Velcro
Use seamripper to tear out thread securing old Velcro

While doing this, I discovered that a piece of the Velcro was sewn down with the tucked end of the fabric. What this means is that if I removed all of the Velcro, the sewn down end, would become loose and the fabric could potentially unravel/fray at the very end.

If I removed the entire piece of Velcro, this end would no longer be sewn tucked under.
If I removed the entire piece of Velcro, this end would no longer be sewn tucked under.

Since this was supposed to be a no-sew project, and I didn’t want to dig out the sewing machine that has been hidden away since we had company for the holidays, I decided to leave half the Velcro on the holder.

I cut half the Velcro off.
I cut half the Velcro off.

Now it’s time to put your snaps on. I’d highly recommend first pulling out a paci to see where your snaps need to go exactly. Once you’ve determined where you want the first half of the snap, pierce a hole there with your awl.

Pierce the holder with your awl.
Pierce the holder with your awl.

Then poke the snap cap through the hole.

Cap poking through
Cap poking through

Make sure it’s poking through in the right direction. That may seem like a no-brainer, but when it’s late at night (or very early), I’ve made mistakes like this.

Place a stud (male part) over the poky end of the cap.

Before pressing

Slide your pliers over the set, until they’re completely level with the cap/stud. Gently squeeze the pliers just a little bit until there is a click. There needs to be a click. This tells you that you have the cap and stud evenly inside of the pliers. If they’re not even within the pliers, you could ruin the set and even ruin the paci holder.

Press down gently until you hear the click.
Press down gently until you hear the click.

Once you hear it click, give the pliers three or four firm squeezes. This will flatten the prong from the cap. Your cap/stud should now look like this:

Pressed stud/cap
Pressed stud/cap

Repeat these steps wherever you want the correlating side of the snap to be. Instead of a stud, you’ll need to use the complementing socket (female).

Completed snap
Completed snap
Voila!
Voila!

I was well supervised during this project.

My helper! Confined to his crib due to excessive exuberance during the sharp pointy parts of the tutorial.
My helper! Confined to his crib due to excessive exuberance during the sharp pointy parts of the tutorial.
Have you completed any DIY projects lately? I’d love to hear about them!

Note: Affiliate link present.

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1 Comment

  1. My children nor grandchildren used paci’s but I sure would have loved this for other projects when they were growing up! Great instructions by the way I stink at directions without pic’s.
    I’m still wondering what the other end holds on to. Lol

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