Review: Nuby natural toothpaste and brush

I’m in the process of going through old blog post drafts that I never finished writing, and I found this one that I meant to post almost 3 years ago!

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From 2014:

Well, this post is a looooong time in coming. This summer (and now fall) has been crammed full for us with Hubby coming home, our move, and my new job, and I have just been too busy to blog! Little J has actually been using the toothpaste for months.

This is probably going to be my last Nuby post, as well. :/ We’ve loved the products we’ve received and that we’ve bought ourselves in store (love, love, love all their teethers), but Little J is getting too big for most of their products.

This year Nuby rolled out their all-natural Toddler Training Toothpaste and toothbrush. The toothpaste is fluoride-free and non-toxic; it’s safe if your little one accidentally swallows a bit. It took Little J a while to understand he’s supposed to spit the paste out completely, so it’s good that it’s safe!

I’m probably not taking Little J to the dentist until he’s at least 3, but in the meantime I want him to develop good dental habits. As part of his bedtime routine, we always brush his teeth. It definitely helps reduce plaque, and it freshens his breath. It has a Tutti Frutti flavor that he really likes; I have to monitor him VERY carefully, or he will use too much!

I think this is a great starter toothpaste, and you can buy this training toothpaste with the included toothbrush at stores like Toys”R”Us, CVS Pharmacy, and Kmart.

Have you tried Nuby’s Toddler Training Toothpaste and brush? What did you think of it?

Note: The products in this post were provided to me free of charge, but the opinions are my own.

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How to hang a wreath without damaging your door

Note: This post contains affiliate links.

This summer J and I bought a house, our first one! It’s been scary, but also it’s been so freeing to be able to put personal touches on our own home. We’ve both lived in rentals for many, many years, but since the Navy has us staying in this area longer, it seemed like the right time for us to buy.

One thing I really wanted to do was put a wreath on my front door. I wanted something that would make our traditional split foyer house look a little more appealing from the road. A couple of weeks ago my local Michaels had a great sale on what Spring and Summer floral stock they had left, and I was able to buy two beautiful full wreaths for about $12 each.

I had my wreaths, but I wasn’t sure how to secure them to the door. I spent some time researching on the Internet, and there are a variety of methods you can use to hang a wreath on your front door. You can use special magnetic wreath hangers for steel doors, Command Brand wreath hooks, or an over-the-door wreath hanger. I’ve also seen posts where people used nails or tacks to secure the wreath to the front of the door, or they used tacks at the top of the door to secure a ribbon that the wreath was hanging on. None of those methods were quite what I was looking for.

I knew I didn’t want to use tacks or nails because I didn’t want to damage the door. I was also concerned that the over-the-door wreath hanger would scrap up the top of our door or keep the door from closing properly. I read several reviews where people who had doors facing the sun found that the Command Brand hooks wouldn’t stay up on the front of the door because of the heat. Our front door gets very hot during the day, so I was afraid that was going to happen.

So what about the magnetic wreath hangers? Well, I was initially going to get one of those as they seemed ideal, but I wasn’t positive that a magnet was going to get a good hold on our door. Pinterest to the rescue! I found photos of a command hook being hung on the back of the door, inside the house, with a ribbon stretched up over top of the door and down to the wreath. So that’s what I did!

I bought a Command Brand hook that holds 5 pounds, and I installed it upside down on the back of our front door. I tied a ribbon to my wreath; I stretched the ribbon over the top of our front door; I secured the ribbon to the Command hook by wrapping it around the hook multiple times and then tying a not. That’s it! This is an easy way to hang a wreath without damaging your front door.
Door wreaths
Door wreaths
Door wreaths

Have you done this? Do you have a wreath on your front door? If so, how did you secure it?
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Campfire pizza log


It’s almost Labor Day -a busy camping weekend- so I wanted to share one of my new favorite camping meals.

Over Memorial Day weekend, we went camping at our favorite place to travel to and camp at, Shenandoah National Park. This time we went with a co-worker of mine and his family. We decided ahead of time to share some meals, so I started researching online different yummy meals for camping. I wanted to up my game since I was cooking for people other than my family!

One meal I came across was the campfire pizza log, but I couldn’t find a site that gave step-by-step instructions. Without instructions, we had to wing it, and we definitely have some lessons learned, which I thought I’d share.

To make the pizza logs, I used:

  • Refrigerated pizza dough (the kind you roll out from a can)
  • Pizza sauce
  • Pepperoni
  • Shredded cheese
  • Olive oil spray (okay, I didn’t actually use this, but I should have, and I will next time)
  • Nonstick foil

The logs are pretty simple to prepare. I made three large pizza logs (three cans of the refrigerated pizza dough), which is what you’ll see in my photos; HOWEVER, because the larger logs didn’t cook evenly, I recommend doing smaller pizza logs, so two logs from each can. I’ve written the directions below to reflect what I will do next time.

Directions for two small pizza logs:

    1. Cut two large pieces of nonstick foil. They should be large enough that you can completely wrap up the pizza logs. It’s better to cut them too big than too small. You can always trim off the excess with some kitchen shears or scissors!
    2. Have the nonstick side facing up off the counter (you’ll want the pizza logs on the nonstick side) and spray the nonstick with an olive oil spray or something similar. This will help keep the pizza log from sticking to the foil when you unwrap it after it’s been cooked.
    3. Before rolling out the pizza dough, cut the dough log in half. You’re going to make two smallish pizza logs from each can of dough.
    4. Place each piece of dough onto its own piece of foil.
    5. Roll out the pizza dough on the foil until each piece is in a rectangle.
    6. Spread the pizza sauce on top.
    7. Layer the pepperoni and cheese. (Obviously you can use whatever toppings you want.)
    8. Roll the pizza back up into the shape of a “log.”
    9. Fold the foil over top of the log and secure all the edges by rolling them in.

Camping Food

Camping Food
I didn’t do it, but cut this in half! Make two pizza logs from this sucker.

Camping Food

Corn and Pizza Logs
The smaller rolls to the left are pieces of corn on the cob. The three long rolls on the right are the campfire pizza logs.

That’s it! I actually froze ours in the freezer since we didn’t intend on eating them the first day of camping. Once they were frozen, I wrapped them in plastic wrap and put them in our camping cooler with ice. I was hoping that as the ice melted, the plastic wrap would help keep any water out of the logs, and it did seem to work.

Camping Food
The two longer rolls are the pizza logs. The small and medium rolls are corn on the cob.

When it was time to cook the pizza logs, we got a nice fire going, and then we placed the pizza logs on the flat griddle above the fire. As I mentioned above, the pizza logs didn’t cook evenly. The logs were getting a nice char in the center within 20 minutes, but these larger logs that I made were so long that the edges were too far away from the fire and weren’t picking up heat. That’s why I suggest making two pizza logs from each can of refrigerated pizza dough. That will get you a more evenly cooked pizza log, and they should be done around 30 minutes.

Camping Food
You can see that the center part of the pizza log is a little more cooked and charred than the edges. That’s why I recommend making smaller logs, so the edges can also reach the fire.

The cooking time is going to vary depending on how hot your fire is and the proximity of the pizza log to the fire, so keep that in mind. You’ll want to peel back the foil about every 10 minutes to check the logs. Use tongs to help you check safely, and if you wear fabric oven mitts … keep them away from the flames!

Camping Food
So tasty inside!

The three cans of refrigerated pizza dough ended up making enough pizza logs to feed 4 adults and 3 small children with leftovers. I also served up some fire-grilled corn on the cob.

Have you ever made a pizza log? What is your favorite camping food?

 

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