DIY Adventures in Diapers: All-in-One diaper

Last week I posted about my experiences making a pocket diaper for my son. I learned from the mistakes I made and applied them to an all-in-one diaper. If you’re unfamiliar with what exactly an all-in-one (AI1) diaper entails, read this post. This style of cloth diaper is the closest to a disposable.

The pattern was similar to the pocket diaper I sewed, but I added an attached insert. There’s still a pocket, so I can add absorbency, if I want, but the diaper can be used as is. Just snap the diaper on the baby, and he’s good to go!

Click on Photos to Enlarge

This medium-size diaper fits babies approximately 18-28 lbs.

Smallest Setting

 

Largest Setting

This AI1 diaper features a PUL outer and fleece inner. I upcycled a fleece blanket to make the lining.

Fleece Inner

A note on fleece: micro-fleece is wonderful for the inside layer of a diaper since it wicks moisture away from skin. However, regular fleece (blizzard, anti-pill) can do the opposite and repel moisture. Since I’d used pieces of this particular blanket before to make a stay dry insert, I was confident this piece of fabric would allow the liquid to pass through into the insert and keep the moisture off my son’s skin.

The pattern instructions called for two inserts to be stacked on top of each other and both sewn into the diaper. I think the bamboo batting I used for inside of the insert must have been much thicker than what was intended for this project, because there was no way I was getting both inserts sewn into the diaper. They were too thick. I also had difficult sewing just one insert to the lining, probably because the regular fleece I used is quite thick. I ended up attaching the insert on one of the shorter ends, instead of sewing it all the way down lengthwise.

Insert attached on one end
Insert attached on one end- can be pulled out to speed drying

Besides the insert difficulties, I struggled with one of the legs. I’m not sure what happened, to be honest, but somehow it turned out twisted:

Twisted leg hole

I decided to take the top stitching out around the legs and resew. The fewer holes in PUL, the better. But with the way the leg is above, it wouldn’t maintain a waterproof seal around my son’s leg anyway, so I figured I might as well try to fix it.

It was slightly improved afterwards (but still looking jacked up):

Stitching uneven but leg elastic area less twisted

My best guess is that it has something to do with how I originally sewed the elastic onto the fabric. Next time, I’ll try be more careful while sewing the elastic on.

I decided to only put elastic on one side of the pocket, the back side of the diaper. This way if I add another insert into the diaper for extra absorbency, it will theoretically come out of the pocket on its own in the wash.

Pocket

I love how soft, squishy, and absorbent-looking this diaper is!

Tips:

PUL can be very difficult to sew with, since it doesn’t feed well through the machine. Place some tissue paper over it (or under it), and this will solve the problem.

Tissue paper makes it easier to sew with PUL

When placing snaps, always reinforce the PUL under the snap. You want this diaper to be completely waterproof. You can either glue an entire yoke of PUL fabric on the inside, before placing the snaps; or, you can just use small squares of fabric. These can be glued on as well, if you want them to lie flat.

Reinforce PUL under snaps

There you have it! Next up on my sewing agenda: a cotton-topped pocket diaper with a hidden PUL layer.

Do you sew your own diapers? Have any tips for me?

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5 Comments

    1. That’s probably what it was! I made another diaper yesterday, and I was very careful to steer clear of the elastic while topstitching around the legs, and they turned out wonderful this time!

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