Taking Your Family to the Hospital: How to Take Care of Them in Time of Need

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Hospital Bed

When a family member has a medical condition that requires hospitalization, it is a time of stress for the patient as well as the family. However, it is in the best interest of the patient and family to be aware of the patient’s needs and of the care being received, and to make the effort to see that the facility giving the medical attention is not negligent and has the procedures in place to earn the patient’s and family’s trust.

Medical Team Response

Monitor the concern of the emergency or admission medical staff to the patient. Response time for taking vital signs, X-Rays, and any other necessary procedures for an accurate diagnosis should be performed in a timely manner relative to the gravity of the patient’s condition. This is the time to be assertive on behalf of your family member and ask questions to assure yourself and the patient that the diagnosis is reasonable and appropriate.

Patient Care Admission

Once the diagnosis is made and is agreed upon by the patient, family, and medical staff, it is important that the patient gets the proper care upon admission.

Care would consist of continued vital sign monitoring, proper medication at the correct time, surgery if required, and the medical staff notifying the patient’s designated family member of any changes to or concern for the patient’s care.

Family Visitation

When a family member is admitted to the hospital, the primary concern is for them to receive the proper care but also for them to rest and recuperate.

A family visit can lift the patient’s spirits, but it is also an opportunity to check the patient for possible bedsores and to view the care and response of the medical staff assigned to your family member; if it is noted the nursing staff is not as quick to respond to medication requirements or other care required, then this is the time to voice your concern and ask for the situation to be corrected.

In conclusion, the best patient advocate is the designated family member, and they have the right and duty to question medical staff that is in authority for changes to care and any other concerns that arise during the patient’s duration of care. Assertiveness by the family member can avoid malpractice and egregious errors by the medical staff and is one way to feel confident the patient will receive the proper attention and an easier recovery.

Author Bio:

Kara Masterson is a freelance writer from West Jordan, Utah. She graduated from the University of Utah and enjoys writing about home and family and spending time with her dog, Max. Information credit to Gittens & Associates, lawyers specializing in personal injury law and car accident in Newfoundland.

Note: I was compensated for this posting this sponsored article. Any opinions written above are the author’s and may differ from yours.

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8 Comments

    1. Elizabeth I hope that you heal from your whiplash, just wanted to share with you a bit of experience, it can have long term lasting effects so make sure that you don’t allow a dr to tell you that your young and will heal eventually especially if this was a direct result of an accident. I settled and didn’t push for the dr to figure out all my issues after my accident in 98, and now I have long term affects that prevents me from working a traditional job.

  1. These are great tips and like I mentioned in the comment to Elizabeth, you are your OWN advocate for your medical care. Don’t be afraid to speak up if your in pain, something is going on that you don’t agree with, ect. STAND up for yourself and your children.

    If you aren’t satisfied with an answer, seek a second opinion.

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